Understanding Earth Shaping

Earth is a lively and dynamic planet that is undergoing rapid changes wrought by the activities of humans. In what ways are these changes impacting on us and other species?
What’s it about?

More than ever before humans are a force of nature that can reprogram the planet. Understanding our abilities means that we are probably the first ever species to consider limiting our activities. Overviews in science, philosophy and policies will equip participants to better understand our unique position and impacts as human Earth shapers.

In this micro-course we question:

  • How will the way humans formulate and apply international and national policies continue to drive change?
  • What are our own values regarding change?
  • How does that colour our perceptions of Earth Shaping? As our planet continues to face rapid changes?
What will I learn?

We have a great team organised to help you understand the way that our amazing planet works now and how that has changed through time. We will look at pre-human Earth Shaping and consider how we humans have become a force that influences changes in the physical world and impacts on organisms. We will get you thinking about your and other people’s values, and why this can be really important for deciding what we should do to deal with these changes. And we will look at governance and how it is an important influence on how Earth and the people who depend on the planet will fare in the future. The power of having a great team is a range of experience and expertise across disciplines. We hope you enjoy learning with us. 

Upon successful completion of this micro course you will be able to:

  • Outline the current scientific theories of how Earth’s natural systems change through time.
  • Identify the values held by you and others in relation to human impacts on natural systems

If you are interested in learning more about where these concepts and skills could take you, consider looking through the Diploma of Sustainable Living or our course and unit handbook to look for other learning opportunities.

What’s involved?

There are 4 learning pathways each containing numerous resources and learning challenges designed to help you develop your thinking in relation to Humans as Earth Shapers. The Four learning pathways are:

  1. Earth Systems; Exploring the basic scientific structures and systems that make our planet
  2. Rock Records; Introduces philosophical principles and demonstrates the art of dating and rock reading.
  3. Earth Systems Exchange; Explores how Humans have contributed to changes in the Earth Systems
  4. Ecology and Evolution; Evolution in detail. Are we precipitating another mass extinction?

The micro-course can be completed in 40 hours, including participation with the assessment task.

 

Credential options: 

The OERu micro-course ‘Understanding Earth Shaping’ contains similar assessment, learning activities and instructional content that feature in the first third of ‘Human’s Earth Shapers’, a University of Tasmania, 12.5% weighted undergraduate unit.

Current Start learning

Course Code: ETHS101
Available: 12 August 2019
Finishes: 31 August 2020
Duration: 4 Weeks,10 hours per week
Type: Micro course
Assessments: 1 Hour open book exam

Credentialing: Microcredential Non-formal recognition
Course Credit: Forms the first third of ‘Human’s Earth Shapers’, a University of Tasmania, 12.5% weighted undergraduate unit.
Additional Courses:
Credential: The OERu micro-course ‘Understanding Earth Shaping’ contains similar assessment, learning activities and instructional content that feature in the first third of ‘Human’s Earth Shapers’, a University of Tasmania, 12.5% weighted undergraduate unit.
Level: 1st year Bachelor’s

Who are the developers:
Ryan Brunton, As a Learning Designer, I collaborate with teaching teams and industry to lead them through a bespoke learning design process, where we leverage Read More
Who are the lead facilitators:
Dr Karin Orth, Dr Karin Orth is an experienced teacher and researcher in the Discipline of Earth Sciences and CODES at the University of Tasmania. She Read More
Associate Professor Zanna Chase, Before joining the University of Tasmania, Associate Professor Chase was a faculty member at Oregon State University (USA), and a postdoctoral fellow at Read More
Dr Joanna Vince, Dr Joanna Vince is a Senior Lecturer in the Politics and International Relations Program, at the School of Social Sciences in the College Read More
Associate Professor Greg Jordan, Associate Professor Greg Jordan is a highly active researcher and teacher in the School of Biological Sciences in the College of Sciences and Read More
DR Graham Wood, Dr Graham Wood's research concerns the relationship between values and science. He examines this relationship within three realms: environmental philosophy, cognitive science of Read More